The Language of Silver Marks

Now I would like to offer some tips on how to determine whether a given object is silver, Old Sheffield Plate or silverplate. In England silver has been marked in some manner since the 12th century when it was first regulated by Parliament. The marks made it possible to trace the maker and the place of manufacture. This helped to protect the consumer, for if it was determined that the silver object was not actually pure enough to be marked as silver, the culprit could be found and punishment could be meted out. As silver objects made before are quite rare, I shall restrict my comments to those made after that date. In Parliament established the standard for purity for sterling silver and instituted a mark indicating that an item is of sufficient purity to be deemed sterling. That standard means an item is made of

The Language of Silver Marks

Sheffield Plate is a cheaper substitute for sterling, produced by fusing sheets of silver to the top and bottom of a sheet of copper or base metal. This ‘silver sandwich’ was then worked into finished pieces. At first it was only put on one side and later was on top and bottom. Modern electroplating was invented by Italian chemist Luigi V.

If you choose collecting antique silver as your main antique interest, you should make sure you know the general history and the historical periods associated with collectable silver. Silver is a precious metal.

The history of this foundry is well documented [1,2,3]. The first foundry was commercially more successful, while the second one was using a more advanced technology of galvanic silver deposition, which was first applied in Esslingen by the German chemist Carl Haegele in , the brother-in-law of Alfred Ritter. In the same year the Esslingen factory was dismantled and its equipment was incorporated into the Geislingen foundry.

During the next thirty years WMF experienced a period of rapid expansion, which lasted until the beginning of the World War in This WMF branch was mostly importing the base-metal items from Geislingen, performing silver-plating and then selling them in Russia under their own marks, see my recent article in ASCAS Newsletter [4].

This firm like R.

BRITISH ELECTROPLATE SILVER AND SILVER PLATE MARKS

My name is David Whitten. Where was it made? What was the name of the company or factory where it was produced? How old is it? Was it mass-produced by machine methods? What type of glass is it made of?

Silver Hallmarks: A U.K. site with an “English Silver Hallmarks” page that shows and explains the British marks. View it at: English Silver Hallmarks Antique Silver: This U.K. site has several helpful pages, like this one with charts of Town Date Marks.

Marked by the inscription “WMF” or “W. Note the special shape of the “F” letter. The length of “WMF” or “W. One of the earliest WMF marks, used from until around Though quite common, it was never mentioned in literature. The rectangle size is 3.

BRITISH ELECTROPLATE SILVER AND SILVER PLATE MARKS

People aren’t necessarily looking only for sterling; they just want to know what they’re buying. Most of the time, you can find the answer simply by turning over the teaspoon, fish fork, ice cream saw, or cheese scoop antique flatware is that specialized. On the reverse side, you usually find an indented mark or series of marks that holds a wealth of information about the item — not only what it’s made of, but sometimes also where, when, and by whom it was made.

This applies to hollowware — such as cups, bowls, teapots, and vases — too. The first step in deciphering these marks is to learn what kinds of silver are out there.

Also has a section of silver plate marks, which can sometimes be even more obscure and harder to identify than sterling silver maker’s marks. 03 of Online Encyclopedia of American Silver Marks. If you’re sure your piece is American made, this is a great place to start your research. This collection of American manufacturers and retailers of.

Products displayed in these tables are not for sale unless otherwise stated. They are included here merely for informational purposes and as examples of items on which the marks are found. Any photographs or other information on this website may not be copied or used by others without our prior permission. Viewer contributions are acknowledged accordingly and are also protected under our copyright notice and may not be copied or used by others without our permission. We welcome and appreciate your submissions.

Please be sure to tell us how you would like to be acknowledged for your contributions — by full name or by initials only, or even anonymous, although we do prefer first and last names. We also like to know your general location such as city, state, country, region, etc. We will honor your wishes and appreciate your help. In business from under the name Abdingdon Sanitary Manufacturing Company, making plumbing fixtures.

The name was changed to Abingdon Potteries in Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.

BRITISH ELECTROPLATE SILVER AND SILVER PLATE MARKS

Josefsen The strong emphasis on enamel on silver that gave Norwegian goldsmiths their reputation made Norwegian silver a growing industry, and meant a lot for the export. This is especially true for the jewelry. Today one can find mid-century enameled jewelry from Norway anywhere in the world. Although Norwegian silver should always be marked, it usually takes some knowledge to decode the different hallmarks that appear. This article gives some guidelines on the subject of hallmarks on modern Norwegian silver.

WMF is the abbreviation for Württembergische Metallwarenfabrik, which means Württemberg Metal Factory and was created in in the small town of Geislingen on the river Steige (Geislingen an der Steige), after the succesful merger of two smaller silver plate foundries.

In addition, in some cases the rhombus with “N” letter is used. Such system of marking is similar to that used by Fraget in the same period. It differs from the previous mark No. The size of the oval is about 7 mm x 9 mm. Similar to the mark No. In earlier version of this mark the catalogue number with a large dot! Note the simultaneous disappearance of the dot after the catalogue number.

Finally, in the later version of this mark, the circle with the swan image under the Star of David in some cases was applied. It is mentioned in the description of Wysiadecki collection [6], items and It is similar to the Norblin mark No. As I do not possess the photo of this mark, I am presenting its characteristic details only. It differs from the mark No. Note that the colon after the inscription “GALW” is made of two quadratic points as before.

Very often one of two points is missing.

BRITISH ELECTROPLATE SILVER AND SILVER PLATE MARKS

A more complete listing of the mark variations can be found in Charles H. Carpenter’s fine book, “Tiffany Silver”. The examples illustrated here include only John C. Moore’s mark, some others were: This practice continued until the mid ‘s. Although America was in a deep economic recession, the store soon acquired a respected name and flourished with its quality merchandise imported from Europe, India and the Orient.

Dating Antique Silver Hallmarks Antique Silver Hallmarks and how to indentify where your silver comes from. Antique silver hallmarks have been used to control the quality of goods made of silver since the 14th century and the organisation that regulates the craft, .

Christofle; An Historical Outline by patrick Today, mention of the name Christofle evokes both the elegance of a bygone era and the concept of innovative modern design. The story of this renowned firm dates from when the young Charles Christofle took the reins of his family’s small jewelry workshop in the Marais district of Paris. Plaque, Antoine Tard 19th Cent. Rosine Bouilhet-Christofle, Charles used his keen managerial skills to enlarge the enterprise and win commissions at home in France and from as far afield as Madagascar and South America.

A business visionary, Charles made a brilliant strategic move came in when he negotiated a license giving him the French rights to the electroplating patents of George and Richard Elkington of Birmingham, England. This, along with the patents of the French chemist Count Henri de Ruolz, enabled Christofle, in , to build a technologically advanced manufacturing plant for plated goods. This step firmly embarked Christofle on its legendary course as manufacturing silversmiths.

During the early years of the plant’s operation, the unplated metalwork was often made by other firms. To Christofle, quality was key and he soon began his own manufactory to create his own forms.

Wedgwood Marks

.

Almost all marks on almost all antique and collectible silver and silver plate, were applied with stamps. Unique, individual or custom marks–such as serial numbers, order numbers, artists marks, hallmarks, etc.–were generally made with hand-struck punches, each punch bearing a single letter, numeral or .

.

The Language of Silver Marks

.

Most extensive internet resource for research of Silver marks, Hallmarks & Maker’s Marks – British Hallmarks.

.

Silverplate Marks versus Sterling Flatware Marks—Basics


Hi! Do you want find a partner for sex? Nothing is more simple! Click here, free registration!